Monthly Archives: February 2017

Student Loan PSA: What Student Debt Really Looks Like

Education

Obtaining your secondary education can be a landmark goal on your journey to success. By opening up opportunities, and enhancing your capabilities, the study of a discipline gives you the skills you need to conquer your future ambitions. More often than not, student loans offer a helpful supplement when financing this experience. However, many students are able to obtain these financial aids without having to budget or offer a credit history, causing a higher likelihood of default among student borrowers. To help avoid this, Putnam Bank suggests answering the following questions before choosing how to pay for your collegiate participation:

What are you starting with?

The first question you should ask yourself is, ‘What money do I have to begin my education?’ If you have applied for and received scholarships, those should first count towards tuition and books. Additionally, if you have any financial support from relatives, these funds may be allocated best at the base of your budget during your college planning. By totaling the sum of these two amounts, you can determine the support outside your own savings that will be contributed towards your future learning efforts. Knowing whether or not this amount will be offered on a recurring basis can help you then decide what financial steps you need to take in order to save, earn, and/or borrow the remaining funds necessary.

How much and how often can you contribute?

After learning your total amount of support, it is now possible to create a plan of action to facilitate the rest. Depending on your length and type of education, your costs may vary drastically. When selecting both a field and institution of study, the factor of price is an important one to consider. By thinking of your education as an investment, you can ensure that you choose both a rewarding and promising career path to help you repay any debt you do incur during this time. To help decrease overall expenditures, many students take on a part-time job to supplement the costs of their education, along with the associated room and board. Utilizing this choice can decrease the overall amount of your anticipated loan, and help you avoid the additional expense of interest. Should the cost your education still be more than you can currently cover, the option of a student loan may be a viable solution.

What is student debt?

While obtaining an education has potential and opportunities, the accompanying debt can often be overbearing. In order to minimize this, we recommend borrowing only the minimum amount needed. By opting for a lesser sum, you are able to save your future-self hundreds or thousands of dollars on interest alone. For example, the average debt for a United States student is approximately $37,172. With borrowers averaging ten years for repayment, the potential cost of interest alone can add up to over $9,000.

Choosing the best option to finance your education can affect your life well past college. To help you make the most informed decisions, our team at Putnam Bank offers sound financial advice and information. To learn more, stop by one of our locations, we’d love to get to know you and your education aspirations.

The Cost of Kids: How to Plan for Your Growing Family

Personal Finances

At Putnam Bank, we understand that adding to your family may not only be an emotional decision but a financial one as well. With the growing costs of childcare alone, it’s important to have a well-rounded plan for covering the expenses of your expanding household. In order to plan most effectively, we recommend structuring your budgeting into these three stages:

Beginning or Before Pregnancy: Examine your current health insurance to determine an estimate of cost for both prenatal care and delivery expenses. While many insurers offer prenatal care at no or little additional cost, the price for delivery can be complex. Study your monthly premium, annual deductible, and out-of-pocket limits for the calendar year to help establish these costs before the baby is delivered.

After Birth: Once the baby is born, there will be traditional costs such as health care, food, diapers, clothing, and more. However, many new parents also spend more on take-out meals to help lessen their time cooking. These expenses, along with a decrease in income for parents on maternity leave, can cause many parents to slide into debt. To help alleviate the burden of these growing figures, we recommend creating a monthly budget to designate every dollar to a purpose. By allocating a specific dollar amount to each area of your spending, you can ensure that all of your costs are covered while also planning for the future.

During the First Year: As your child continues to grow, the costs for new clothes and equipment will continue to grow with them. Many expectant parents can spend upwards of $16,000 during the first year of their child’s life, and variables such as location, number of children, and other factors can contribute to the overall costs as well. When possible we recommend saving for each step in your child’s growth. From birth to three month’s they’ll need many one-time purchases, but during the later stages, you may have adequate time to save for each time period’s necessities.

Continue to grow your finances as you grow your family using Putnam Bank’s trusted deposit services. We’ll help you organize your funds, and make the most of your savings.

Can You Really Save on Travel: True or False?

Saving Money

Checking numerous sites for the best deal can be labor-intensive, and potentially counterproductive. With many American travelers turning to vacation book sites and apps, Putnam Bank is curious if they really save you money. After thorough research, we’ve discovered these four truths to successfully budgeting your next getaway:

TRUE: Travel sites offer money-saving opportunities.

FALSE: The lowest value is found on the hotel’s or airline’s website.

Many travel booking sites offer discounted airfare and accommodation, boasting the same services, only at a fraction of the cost. However, many times these sites merely display the cost an airline or hotel already has on their own site at no additional reduction. Select providers have begun to reduce participation in these travel search engines, and strive to instead offer their continued customers the best value straight from their own corporation.

TRUE: Credit cards are the most secure and affordable payment option while abroad.

FALSE: Airport currency exchange is worth the convenience.  

While there are many different options to exchange currency before your next trip, the safest method of payment during your getaway will still be your credit card. With many options now offering no currency exchange fees, you’re sure to avoid unwanted conversions costs while still protecting your finances. According to both Visa and Mastercard, credit card users are held liable for zero percent of any fraudulent charges. This means that should your credit card information become compromised during your stay, you won’t lose any funds because of it.

TRUE: Traveling outside of the peak seasons offers great savings.

FALSE: The skiing in Colorado is great in June.

While it is true that avoiding the crowds can save you and your family some extra dollars, it may not be worth it if it means decreasing the activities of your trip completely. Instead of limiting your travel timeline, we recommend looking for alternative accommodations such as VRBO (Vacation Rentals by Owner), along with creative dining options, to maximize your destination’s budget. These additional savings can help to bring your overall cost down, while still making your dream vacation a reality.

TRUE: You can save a lot of money by using airline miles.

FALSE: Airline credit cards are worth the annual fee for a yearly vacation.

Unless you plan to fly every month, an airline credit card is hardly worth the cost. While these cards offer tempting miles for flights, increasing numbers of travel options are blacked out throughout the year. The annual credit card fee for United, American, and Delta, costs approximately $95.00 after your first year of use. While boarding in group one can be a well-enjoyed perk, it doesn’t boast much ROI for fliers who are simply looking to reach their annual destination.

As you begin to plan your next vacation, Putnam Bank looks forward to helping you save the funds to make it happen. Stop in today and learn how to open a designated savings account!

How to Save for Retirement at Every Age

Retirement Savings

How much do you need to retire? Will you continue working after age 65? Do you want to travel during your retirement? These are just a handful of questions that are important for retirement preparation. Unlike saving for a home or a new vehicle, saving for retirement requires long-term commitment and goal-oriented benchmarks. At Putnam Bank we want to help you succeed as you save, and offer these milestone marks:

Age 18-25: During this point in your life, you are discovering what you want to do, and how to get there. Focus on creating a solid foundation through a monthly budget, and designated emergency fund. If your employer offers a 401(k) option we highly recommend utilizing its potential by contributing the maximum amount your budget will allow. Always be sure to take advantage of a company matching policy if available.

Age 25-35: In addition to your 401(k), we also suggest opening an IRA. This enables you to continue to save without having your funds tied to an employer. Now is a great time to take advantage of other tax beneficial accounts, such as an H.S.A., 529, or Coverdell account. Both the 529 and Coverdell accounts aid you in saving for your child’s education without the burden of taxes.

Age 35-45: One of the key aspects of retirement is making sure your money is where you need it when you need it. An experienced financial adviser can help you invest in appropriate stocks, bonds, and other financial strategies. Together you can construct a plan to ensure your risk decreases as you age, and be certain the funds you need are available upon retirement.

Age 45-55: Now is the time to examine your current career path, and determine the year at which you would like to retire. Although the average age of retirement is 66, this may not hold true for you. Whether you decide to retire later at 72, or earlier at 57, you’ll need to have this number available to help continue the development of your savings. To easily calculate your current savings projection, this tool can provide information to help you make the most informed decision for your specific goal.

Age 55-66: During this time you may begin to qualify for distributions from your 401(k) and IRA. By postponing these distributions, you can continue to save, and work to build your retirement nest egg before you need it. Additionally, look into various employment options upon retirement. If you decide to work part-time for enjoyment, it could mean added savings to help you afford splurging in the future.

Age 66 and up: Once you have officially retired, you will begin to take distributions from your 401(k) and IRA. While both a 401(k) and Traditional IRA require you to accept funds after age 70 ½ , a Roth IRA can remain untouched until you decide to use the money. For this reason, we recommend using a Roth IRA when your income levels allow.

We look forward to joining you on your journey to retirement. Whether it’s in 10 years or 50, it’s never too early to start saving! Call Ray Perry today at 860-928-6501 x3076 to arrange your complimentary financial consultation.